Don't be fooled. Inside this thin coating of sweetness is a fiery core of total insanity.

Friday, February 22, 2013

On The Beach at the NWFGS

Another favorite display garden at this year's Northwest Flower and Garden Show was entitled "A Pacific Northwest Beach Garden: It's Never Too Late to Learn to Dance." It takes its inspiration from the movie Zorba The Greek (which I have never seen). This garden was designed by Susan Calhoun of Plantswoman Design, Inc.

Their handout says "The garden Plantswoman Design has created for you is a small glimpse into the ways we can bring the beach home to everyone whether you live by the water or  not. Our hardscape consists of gravel, reclaimed driftwood, landscape boulders and natural stone pavers that lay the foundation for this beach getaway. Unusual pants can  be found in every nook and cranny from the edges of the rocks and driftwood to the forest edge behind the beach shack. Soft grasses mixed with fragrant blossoms that thrive in sun or shade surround the dancing area. Seasonal color along with foliage texture and contrast adds visual interest."

I liked that this garden was a walk-through design. The audience was invited to walk through the garden, past the beach shack, although not to step onto the grassy area. The garden, unfortunately, did not benefit from being on its own on the show floor. I noticed that other gardens were able to, in some cases, borrow neighboring foliage. The beach shack would have looked much better with more of a foliage screen behind it, separating it from the marketplace that was directly adjacent to it, or perhaps a fence or some other kind of structure. But it had a lot of lovely touches, such as the driftwood and the scattered beach glass, pebbles and shells, as well as two colorful, drippy fountains.




I loved the ornamental grass mixed with Daffodils.

Scattered beach glass, shells and snowdrops tucked in here and there.



The path looked like either packed sand or decomposed granite

Grevillea juniperina 'Lava Cascade'




A Bougainvillea added some lovely peachy color



A column inspired by Little and Lewis dripped moisture onto a bed of river rocks

The beach shack was flanked by a monolithic pot on one side, and on the other by two more dripping columns inspired by the works of Little and Lewis.



More to come, if you're not too bored!

5 comments:

  1. Beautiful pictures of a gorgeous garden! You didn't just take these today did you? I'd hate to call you a fast woman.

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  2. Excellent review of this garden. In person I didn't clue into its "aloneness" like you did, but now that you mentioned it I realize you we're right on and that was a detriment to it's success. There was a lot to love like the pebble hardscape, and the Scheffleras, but the use of agaves in deep mulch right next to the lawn kind of irritate me. They wouldn't last a single season like that!

    Thank you for a very fun luch outing. Like I said on Peter's blog I feel kind of like I talk both of your ears off...

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  3. You are so right...they could have set up a row of bamboo to screen the scene from its surroundings. I love the vignette of the snowdrops in the driftwood, and the columns are great.

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  4. I like the Snowdrops planted in the hollow of the log. Very clever.

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