Don't be fooled. Inside this thin coating of sweetness is a fiery core of total insanity.

Monday, April 11, 2016

Dandelion, Dandelion...

The other day in the front garden, it was like a game of Duck, Duck, Goose, but with dandelions. They're everywhere in my garden this year, partly because I kind of abandoned the garden in the last half of the season last year. I injured my back and shoulders, and was in a bit of a quandary as to priorities.

Anyway, now I have dandelions here, there, and everywhere.

I gave up working on the gravel bed, and dandelions, shotweed, and Mexican feather grass have taken over.



They're in the parking strip out by the street.

They're in the beds.

Of course they're in the "lawn."

This one tried to disguise itself as a California poppy.

And I've got way too many of these already!


But...here's the goose in the game. It's a Calendula, which overwintered in the garden and is already blooming. I spied it through the undergrowth and at first, thought "That's a strange dandelion."




We had such a mild winter temperature-wise, that I have other Calendulas that have leafed out already and will also be flowering soon.





They're not the prettiest plants, but how can I say no to flowers like this?

Calendula 'Solar Flashback'

I posted recently that I thought I had enough dandelions and shotweed to feed a small army (both are edible weeds). There's actually lots more you can do with dandelions. Here's an article with all kinds of ideas -- from using them medicinally to cooking the greens with garlic to making dye.

One good thing about Calendula -- it's edible too! I have a veritable vegetarian feast growing with almost no effort.

12 comments:

  1. You have to think like a kid who would be all excited at those bright yellow flowers and would pick you a bouquet if left to their own devices in the garden.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ah...that's a lot of dandelions! I fear I may be joining you soon as our next door neighbor seems to not give a care what his front "lawn" is up to. The dandelions and shot-weed are out of control.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well, they are pretty. I'm glad your neck and shoulders are better.

    ReplyDelete
  4. And just think of the pollinators you're feeding. The weather is warming, and your back and shoulder have mostly recovered: I bet you'll have things whipped into shape sooner than you think. Or enlist Nigel to lend his hand to the task ;-).

    ReplyDelete
  5. I guess it's their rampant spreading that gave dandelions their bad rep. They're really rather pretty (not that that stops me from pulling them either). The raccoons here "pulled" all my Calendula as seedlings. Perhaps I could send you one to help with your weeding? They're good with snail removal too ;)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Alison, I've been gone too long again, and I'm sorry to hear you had shoulder and back issues, but am hopeful they are on the mend? Oh, those dandelions, I swear they are the most prolific plant on the planet.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Dandelions. Aren't they seasonal and disappear with hot weather? I am counting on that.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I have almost all of the shotweed out at last--and it took weeks , but they were spewing the seeds like mad. I hate to think what it's going to be like next year.

    ReplyDelete
  9. You know, maybe if you start wanting dandelions for food, they'll stop growing? That always worked for me and purslane. As soon as I discovered you could eat it (and it's good!) all the weeds up and disappeared. Good luck getting to the dandelions!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I would rather have dandelions than shot weed. Having both is a real challenge. Will you be digging them out, spraying, or picking pretty yellow bouquets?

    ReplyDelete
  11. I remember my mother and grandmother cutting dandelion greens early in the year to cook and eat but never tried them myself. The link had lots of interesting ideas!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have mixed feelings about dandelions. The flowers are cheerful, but they spread like crazy and the roots are almost impossible to remove.

    ReplyDelete

Gardening is a solitary activity. But blogging about it is a social phenomenon! I don't make money from my blog by advertising, or use it to drive customers to a business. If you liked my post, or my writing or photography, or even just one picture or turn of phrase, I'd love to hear from you. That's how I get paid.