Friday, August 5, 2011

Hopes for August

Well, back in July, I was hoping that the raccoon that has been haunting my garden wouldn't find my veggies. So far, she hasn't, although she is definitely still hanging around. I'm not actually getting much from my veggie garden at the moment either. I have lots of very small green tomatoes, but only one tiny red one. The last few days have been warm and sunny, but today it is cloudy and cool again, which doesn't bode well for the tomatoes. Ah well, I hope in August I get some ripe ones.



For August, I am also hoping that the string algae that has been plaguing my stream for the entire spring and summer finally dies and goes away. I have been pulling it and pulling it, and it just keeps growing back worse than ever. It is so hard to pull, I imagine it must be kind of like trying to grab a jellyfish (but without the sting).

Nasty, slimy stuff!


I just spent a good hour or so tromping around in the water over the rocks, pulling and scraping at the stones with my hands and feet. I'm not a fan of using chemicals at the drop of a hat in the garden, but I'm thinking I might order some chemicals over the internet to kill it once and for all. Short of taking the rocks out and scrubbing them with a scrub brush, I can't think of another solution.

Here are the results of my tromping around.

If you look closely, you can see there is still quite a lot clinging to the rocks. It just won't let go!

It does look better.

Before


After


Before


After

If you want to read about what other gardeners are hoping for in the month of August, check out Sweet Bean Gardening's Hope Grows post.

10 comments:

  1. I have used D-Solv Oxy Pond Cleaner in my pond for string algae for years. It deep cleans rocks, waterfalls, plant pots, streams and anywhere organic debris accumulates. Eliminates pond cleaning, uses oxygen power, non-toxic to fish. It is made by Crystal Clear/Winston Company, Inc. (www.winstoncompany.com). I also use snails in the pond (Trapdoor snails) they eat the algae. But the temperature must be warm for them to be active, they were slow to start with the cool spring. But now there is hardly any algae in the pond or over the waterfall. E-mail me if you require more information and good luck.

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  2. If you find something that works for string algae let me know. It's been awful this year and I do think it's the weather. Normally it's mostly gone by now. It sure does look good after all your work.
    Veggies are slow going here too, I hope the sun comes back because I really did notice things starting to grow better.

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  3. Oh my....that looks like a lot of work! I used to think algae was kind of pretty...I was wrong.

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  4. There is also bailed barley. It's supposed to help with string algae. Your after photos are amazing. What a beautiful water feature. Good luck with your veggies. It's just one of those years, isn't it?

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  5. Hope you can conquer that string algae. What a mess to deal with! I sure love the look of your water feature.

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  6. Alison, your before and after pictures show how much you've done! I join your other readers and say that this water feature looks very nice!
    Thanks for your comment on my escallonia. It looks better in summer. In winter, I could see all its branches growing crazily in all possible directions. It stays green, but looks ... not nice. I even planned to dig it out and replace with another shrubs, but I can't do that after seeing it in full bloom with hundreds of the bees.

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  7. There is always some work involved with ponds and streams. You have to want a water feature a lot to have all the maintenance. It does look pretty and I am sure it attracts a lot of wildlife, even some you may not want.

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  8. Alison, you are an intrepid algae harvester. I don't know if I could do it, it's so dang slimy. We had a 'babbling brook' (Carl's name for it) for awhile, but it looked nothing like your gorgeous stream. Yours is amazing! Water features are a lot of work, but they're worth it for all the beauty and tranquility they provide. We ended up removing our brook only because we built the Quarry, which of course has it's own nightmare issues...one being the woodchuck who is undermining the literally tons of rock holding up the waterfall. Oh, there's always something! Hopefully your readers can steer you in the right direction for control of the algae, but it looks pristine to me now.

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  9. As a fellow pond and stream addict I'm really impressed with your stream - especially once you'd pulled the string algae out!

    I can't remember where I wandered into here from (!), but I'm glad I did because I've had a really nice time reading all your backposts and admiring your lovely garden. Thank you :)

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  10. Eeeew! Nasty stuff! Your pond looks loads better though...and it's a very pretty pond. I like all the rocks by the sides.

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