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Thursday, March 15, 2018

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day -- March 2018

It's hard to believe it's the middle of the month already. Time just seems to fly so quickly lately. The Spring equinox (the first day of astronomical Spring) is right around the corner, and if you follow meteorological seasons, Spring is already here. The middle of the month means it's Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, so it's time to show some flowers. There's more than last month, but still not a lot. That blast of snow and cold weather a couple of weeks ago might have set us back a bit.

Iris reticulata by the stream (the wires are from the electric fence)

I don't remember the name, I could look it up, but...where's the fun in that? I do remember picking one that would be a nice, deep color, although this shows it as more blue than it is

Hamamelis

Indian plum (Oemleria cerasiformis) is in full flower, and from across the garden, even on gray days, this small tree full of hanging flowers seems to sparkle


Erythronium

Brunnera 'Jack Frost'

Two nodding Hellebores from outside

And the same from inside (or down under)

One very dark red Hellebore

Speckled pink with a collarette


Ribes speciosum

Crocuses

Cyclamen coum

Euphorbia rigida

Euphorbia rigida

Pieris japonica 'Shy' -- a recent purchase flowering profusely in the pot ghetto

And in the greenhouse...

Red-headed Irishman -- a tiny Cactus with tiny flowers

That's about it. My Camellia and Forsythia are budded up, but not flowering yet, and all the Primroses are pretty ragged-looking.

Carol at May Dreams Gardens hosts Garden Bloggers Bloom Day on the 15th of every month. Check out her post here.

12 comments:

  1. Happy GBBD pal! Your garden is waking up beautifully. Must go out and check my Ribes speciosum to see if it's blooming as there were no open buds the other day when I went out with the camera. It makes me smile to think that we both have the same Pieris japonica 'Shy' and will be interesting in future years to see if they bloom at the same time.

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  2. Ah! Thanks for the look at your Euphorbia rigida, which is definitely different than mine...and rigid!

    No blooms on my Red-headed Irishman...

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  3. The photo of the Erythronium bloom is fantastic, but the baby cacti steals the show.

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  4. I planted Ribes last year and can't wait to see it bloom. I don't believe it is doing anything at the moment. Not familiar with Indian Plum - very interesting! The Pieris are just insane here. They bloom so profusely.

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  5. Oh, envious of where you are, springwise! We'll have some weeks yet until we can get excited about more than the first snowdrops. It has been a while since my last visit, Alison, and I love your new blog theme and banner. Fun, and reflective of your sense of humour. Cheers!

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  6. You have so many plants I covet, from the Erythronium to the hellebores to the crocus. Yes, I know I have nothing much to complain about when it comes to blooms, but we gardeners are greedy creatures, or is it just me?

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  7. Okay, you got me. I'd never heard of the Indian Plum tree before -- and it's a native, and a very sweet looking thing too. Now I can look forward to seeing your photos of it throughout the season -- grazzi!

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  8. Thanks for showing us your blooms! I enjoyed being out in the yard this afternoon with flowers for company too.

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  9. So the Outlaw needs to check his Ribes speciosum?

    You did find quite a few beautifully delicate and colorful blooms in this early season. I enjoy seeing so many of the plants I can't grow.

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  10. That Ribes speciosum looks fabulous with its little red lanterns. Looks like a plant I could really love! And, I'm a big fan of the Indian Plum, too - they are so graceful and airy!

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  11. Stunning irises, hellebores and euphorbia. Especially in the sun!

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  12. Nice, especially the Erythronium and Irises.

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