Don't be fooled. Inside this thin coating of sweetness is a fiery core of total insanity.

Sunday, June 21, 2015

Sunny Summer Solstice Sunday

Of all the various flower forms in my garden, I like the form of lilies best, both true lilies and daylilies (which aren't really lilies, but the flower is a similar form). It's been a favorite for as long as I can remember, since I was a little girl and tried to convince my mother to grow Hemerocallis fulva, the common orange daylily or ditch lily, in our garden. She refused and said it was a weed.

When we lived in Massachusetts true lilies, grown from bulbs, were one of the first things I planted (along with some of those ditch lilies that Mom despised). But the lilies very quickly, within about 3 years, succumbed to a truly disgusting lily leaf beetle infestation. Read about them and their horrible offspring here. I contented myself with daylilies, which come in a wonderful variety of colors and color combinations. I discovered when we moved to Washington that the lily leaf beetle hadn't made it this far west (yet). I was so delighted to plant these big luscious flowers again!










Much to my dismay, I discovered recently that many daylilies here in the PNW are falling prey to a scourge called the gall midge, which infests the flower buds before they open and deforms them so they never open properly. I have several that I've removed every single flower scape from in an attempt to remedy the situation. Some, however, are still completely untouched. Unlike the lily leaf beetle, I don't think the gall midge will eventually kill the entire plant, but they certainly do make them less garden-worthy. But here are the few lucky ones in my garden that so far have escaped unscathed.






Do you have a favorite flower form in your garden?

8 comments:

  1. I love lilies and daylilies and everything else with a trumpet shape like Brugs and Daturas, but my favorite might be daisy shapes because there are so many. Tithonia is just starting here, rudbeckia are in full bloom, Shastas wish it wasn't so hot. Benficials seem to find them irrestible, all those daisies. It's as if they're at a pizza bar.

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  2. Both are beauties! Our garden is so densely planted and on the shady side already to have lilies but in the future, space permitting we'd like to have more again.

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  3. I have not had good luck with lilies lasting indefinitely, most are now gone, I think the Trumpet lilies have done best. At one time I had 380 named varieties of daylilies from my club and internet exchanges. But they have lapsed into disorder, however I am rather remote so maybe they can escape the gall midge, I hope. While I like these flowers, for form I guess my favorite is the many-petaled OGR rose, especially with fragrance. But I'm a sucker for any flower, really. Sorry to hear of your battle with the gall midge.

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  4. I love Lilies and am due to add more ...I never got around to it this year. It's so hard to pick a favorite flower form -I love umbillifers , I love spikes , and bobbly-spheres too.

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  5. Beautiful closeups! I love how intricate flowers are. Your lilies are incredible. Thanks for sharing. I'm still on irises and lilacs here.

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  6. Now those are daylilies I could get on board with.

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  7. Your lilies and daylilies are beautiful. I haven't heard of the gall midge, which I assume means it hasn't hitchhiked here yet. I do have a problem with rust on a some of my daylilies, though, including one of my favorites, 'Spanish Harlem'. It's a "new" problem too, discovered in the US in 2000. It mars the foliage without harming the flowers or killing the plant but it's still annoying. As to your question, I'm partial to daisy-shaped flowers.

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  8. Beautiful! My daylilies aren't open yet but the few asiatic lilies I have are. One of my favorite daylilies has deformed flower buds. I've had it for years and don't want to get rid of the plant but I'll go out and remove all of the scapes and bun them.

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