Saturday, January 15, 2011

Fertilizer Friday -- The Garden I Left Behind

I know I'm a day late with this, but I needed the time to sift through old pictures of my previous garden where I lived in Massachusetts. I've been feeling a bit winter-weary with nothing out there but soggy grass and bare beds. When we moved to Washington from Massachusetts about 2 years ago, I left behind a mature garden that I had been working on for over 20 years. That's a lot of plants and hard work to just say good-bye to. Some day the bare soil here will be covered in lovely blooming plants. Hopefully it won't take another 20 years.

Anyway, for FF, I decided to post summer photos of my old garden. Please bear with me on the photography, I took these before I discovered the macro setting on my camera.

I had quite a few daylilies in that garden, one of my all-time favorite perennials. I don't remember all their names, sorry.


I do know this next one is Strawberry Candy.

And this is Barbara Mitchell.

El Desperado

I had lots of coneflowers. This is White Swan.

The butterflies loved them.

I think this Geranium was called 'Tiny Monster.'

A Russell Lupine grown from seed.

Sarah Bernhardt peony

New Dawn rose.

Clematis jackmanii

We had a pond which we dug and installed ourselves. It was a wonderful place to sit and contemplate the garden (although I seldom did, I was too busy pulling weeds).


The froggies loved it!

I have to remind myself not to miss that garden. The climate here is so different. Here right now I have soggy bare soil. But back there right now, the garden looks like this, a view that won't change for the next three months.


Don't forget to check out all the other Fertilizer Friday posts at Tootsie Time!

22 comments:

  1. Oh I would miss that garden too! It is always bittersweet to look back at what we left behind...but sometimes it inspires us to add what we really loved and omit what we might have been better to live without! Your flowers are gorgeous in these photos...I love all the beautiful colors!
    Thanks so much for linking in this week...I do hope you will join again soon!
    I am following you on networked blogs now...as well as in general! Have a great weekend!

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  2. So many pretty flowers! I just bought Strawberry candy last year and just put in an order for Barbara Mitchell. Your pond looked really nice. I know your garden is going to be beautiful and already is looking great. Can't wait to see some sun, it's been pouring here.

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  3. I would miss that garden too! Your flowers are so beautiful. I am sure your new garden will take shape in a very short time.
    Thanks for commenting on my post. That pink and blue flower is not a Thalicrum.

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  4. that's so inspiring that you cared for a garden for 20 years. im at about year one right now and loving it. still trying to figure out what i'm doing for sure. i bet you have a challenge in front of you in washington. i can only imagine what must thrive in that environment.

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  5. I would miss all of that, too, especially the lupines, which I can't seem to grow. I grow lots of daylilies, though, and don't remember lots of their names, either.

    Have fun filling up your new spaces when they get dry enough!

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  6. Oh, Alison! What a beautiful garden you nurtured for so many years. No wonder you're feeling nostalgic! I can empathise fully with you on this, as we've lived in our home for 27 years and created our garden from scratch as well. I can't imagine having to leave it all behind!

    Thank you so much for sharing these lovely pictures of your beautiful flowers and garden scenes with us - perhaps, while you're waiting for Spring, you'll share many more with us? I'd love to see more of the garden and your pond up close - the resident froggie has me green with envy!

    Your Washington garden will soon be as lovely as your other garden, so keep those spirits up! Once a gardener, always a gardener! And part of that is confronting new challenges with vigour and enthusiasm - of which you have plenty! And, just think, this time around you're working from a position of great strength - a lifetime of experience to guide you!

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  7. Ooops! Also wanted to say how LOVELY your new profile picture is! You look beautiful :)

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  8. Your daylilies are beautiful, it would be difficult to leave them behind. My garden is only 2 years old and yet eventually less than 2 years from now I have to leave them. It breaks my heart but I am proud with what I will leave from a bare patch to so many living things I have created in our garden for future tenants. Then we will embark for a new adventure in a new garden.

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  9. Hello Alison, I can only imagine leaving our home after 18 years and all we did to this barren soil, but the beauty of what you did is in your heart and that you brought with you. ;)

    That first daylily looks a bit like Russian Rhapsody, one of my absolute favorites, and if you need a start, just let me know. I am always happy to divide and share what we can.

    Beautiful photos of a lovely garden.

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  10. It couldn't have been easy to leave that lovely garden behind. I hope you have an early spring so you can get started on your new garden. Lovely daylilies.

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  11. What a beautiful garden, it must have been diffidult to leave it behind. But in our West Coast weather, it should be pretty easy to fill your new one. I am grateful to family and garden-swap friends I met online (through Gardenweb forums, originally) who supplied me with many of my plants. It is too painful to build a garden at retail prices.

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  12. I am sure it brings back a flood of memories to re-visit your previous garden, Alison. I hope the people who live there now are enjoying all of your hard work and hopefully doing maintenance, etc., to keep it looking so nice. I remember when my mom moved from her home in OH to a new one in SC, the people who bought it tore up all of her established perennial gardens around the entire house and yard. Her neighbors told her about it. While it is up to the new owners to do what they want, it's a bit tough to know everything was destroyed. At least you didn't mention anything like that happened! Anyway, your photos are lovely;-)

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  13. Lovely post...it is always hard to leave a garden behind...all that work, all that planning. :-)

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  14. aloha

    this is a beautiful garden, you did such a wonderful job :)

    have a great weekend

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  15. Alison, I can understand why you miss that garden, but I know that with time, planning and work you will create another beautiful garden. I think you will have opportunity to have plants growing almost every month of the year. I am a fan of a Washington gardener's blog. It's called A Gardener in Progress and here is the link: http://agardenerinprogress.blogspot.com/. Good luck!
    Blessings, Beth
    p.s. I LOVE strawberry candy and El Desperado!

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  16. Gorgeous photos. It's sad to say good-bye to a garden but think of all the fun you'll have planting a brand new one!

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  17. lovely garden...many of these flowers are in my garden...you can see the love you poured into the land....beautiful!!

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  18. Hi Alison, you have a created a lovely and full of happy memories in your garden. Please share your expertise with us for "Seed Week". I too will miss my garden now when we leave it as it is also full of my 2 boys childhood memories:).

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  19. Alison, it's clear you are a master hand at gardening. I look forward to reading more of your posts this upcoming year and seeing your new gardens blossom. Cheers, Jenni ~ RainyDayGardener

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  20. I really look forward to following your progress. I too came from a Zone 5 garden to Zone 8, though I did not have 20 years in that garden. I understand how hard it is to leave a garden behind. But Zone 8 will bring you much joy! Thanks for the blog, and I can't wait to see more :)

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  21. Oh, you already mentioned the wet soil. Is that mostly in early spring?

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