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Sunday, March 15, 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, March, 2015

With the warm, dry weather we've had this month, the garden is speeding toward spring (hard to believe it is not technically spring yet). I'm making good progress on clean-up, but with the rapid pace that things are progressing out there, because of the weather, I feel like I'm running to catch up.

The spring ephemerals and many bulbs are up and flowering, and will be starting to fade before I can draw breath.

Trillium ovatum, our PNW native, will turn pink over the next few days, as it ages

Jeffersonia diphylla

Hepatica

I need to buy more of these taller Primroses, the slugs like the Primula vulgaris too much, but they seem to leave these taller ones like P. veris, P. elatior and P. denticulata alone.

Primula veris

Primula elatior 'Victoriana Gold Lace Red'

Chionodoxa

Double Daffodil

Erysimum 'Winter Sorbet'

Epimedium with Hellebore out of focus behind

Pulmonaria

That's my blooms for Garden Bloggers Bloom Day! Hosted by Carol Michel of May Dreams Gardens on the 15th of every month, GBBD is a great way to keep records of what blooms when each year. You can read Carol's post here, and check out other bloggers around the world who are also showing off their flowers.

17 comments:

  1. So many different blooms already. I´m thrilled about your Trillium ovatum, it won´t grow in my garden but I see it´s native in your country. And the Erysium is already flowering, I have to wait another few weeks I suppose. Thank you for the lovely flower post.

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  2. Love the trillium ovatum, looks a lot like our native trillium catesbi

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  3. Trilliums and hepatica.. two of my favourites.

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  4. I can completely relate to your statement about feeling like you are running to catch up to the blooms and the clean up! The rain this weekend is welcome :) I love the colors of your Primula elatior 'Victoriana Gold Lace Red', what a beautiful bloom!

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  5. What an crazy warm late winter we've had and you have the early blooms to prove it! Seems like winter is back today with the wind and rain!

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  6. You're way ahead of me in the blooms ! Mine are just beginning pop up !

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  7. Fun! I took a few photos of blooms in my garden a couple of days a go. I just need time to get a post put together!

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  8. Oh that Erysimum 'Winter Sorbet' had me Googling to learn more. The images that come up there are so much more purple, where as yours looks orange with a touch of pink. Did you just catch it at the perfect (to me) moment or is it always like that?

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    1. Loree, when I first bought it back in January, it had a lot more purple in it, since then the flowers have been less purple and more like this. I haven't put it in the ground yet, and neglected to water it for a bit when we first started getting such warm, dry days, so it's possible that lack of water might have affected the color of the flowers. Not sure what I did, but I like this color much better.

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  9. As a Wisconsinite, I can empathize with your move to the PNW. Now you can grow those beautiful primroses with the lovely gold lace. Mine never make it through the winter.

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  10. Such beautiful blooms, Alison! You've so many things I associate with spring even though we'd be hard to grow them here. This is the second time I've seen that wonderful Erysimum - I've never seen it here but will have to look for it!

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  11. I've always wanted to experiment with Epimediums, I think I have a spot they might work in, but I fear the dry summers might do them in. I love your selection this month !

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  12. My Epimedium are not showing any sign of blooming yet, you have so many plants in flower, spring has certainly arrived in your garden. Your cowslip is also ahead of mine, we have quite a lot where I have allowed them to seed around, but will have to wait a bit longer for flowers. Trillium are on my wish list for planting next autumn in the woodland, I have been wanting to plant some there for such a long time, I really must do it this year.

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  13. I was hoping the taller primulas would be less attractive to slugs. Thanks for confirming that.

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  14. The Erysimum 'Winter Sorbet' is such a pretty color! I will have to watch for it. Your Trilliums are blooming ahead of mine, I'm looking forward to see if my new 'luteum' will bloom, and looking forward to the taller Primulas too. Lots of lovely flowers!

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  15. Oh Alison - I covet your Primula veris. They grow wild in Sweden, and I have fond memories of me and my dad heading out to try to find them! I remember the triumph of finding some and bringing home a bouquet. The Hepaticas grow wild too, but I hear they are becoming a rarity, and people are not allowed to pick them anymore. I imagine it was 'enthusiasts' like me that caused their demise... Happy Spring!

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  16. Lovely blooms, Alison. You are a bit ahead of us.Great to have trilliums and epimediums out. I love hepaticas but the more unusual ones are so expensive here.

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