Don't be fooled. Inside this thin coating of sweetness is a fiery core of total insanity.

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Wednesday Vignette

A couple of weekends ago I enlisted the aid of my very own pack animal (aka Nigel) to start hauling my tender plants into the greenhouse, which I had cleaned all the tomatoes out of the day before. Nigel described this process as a cross between Plants vs. Zombies and Tetris. I call it The Great Migration (the fall version). There's a spring version too, where we haul them all OUT of the greenhouse and figure out where they're going to be displayed in the garden for the season.

There were a couple of plants that I brought into the house, one of which was the Begonia luxurians that I got a couple of years ago, as a rooted cutting from my garden touring buddy Peter The Outlaw Gardener. Every year it gets very tall and lanky, but I think this may be the first time it has flowered. It's sitting in my only south-facing window, getting as much sun as possible. In the spring I'm planning to knock it out of its pot, scruff up the root ball, and replace some of the soil with new, fertilizer-laced potting soil, a strategy that worked wonders on my Brugmansias. Hopefully, this will encourage the plant to be more lush next year, because the foliage is the main reason to grow this plant.

The flowers are cute too, though.

Begonia luxurians

I'm sharing this photo of the flowers backed by foliage for Wednesday Vignette, hosted by Anna at Flutter and Hum. Go here to see her post today.

12 comments:

  1. The cutting I got at the spring swap bloomed twice. I brought it in a week ago and it's already losing leaves. :(

    ReplyDelete
  2. Dainty blooms, in contrast to its showy large foliage.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very pretty! I'm glad you made it through The Great Migration, though it's so hard to believe it's already time for that when we're not even done with summer here. (I'm NOT bragging - I REALLY want summer to end.)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I saw photos of Peter's Great Migration. Now I need to see yours.
    I "migrated" my glass flowers into the garage for winter storage today.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your talk of moving plants back into the greenhouse made me get up and grab a few of my tender agaves and put them in the house. I had forgotten about them. oops! I do like that delicate flower on Begonia luxurians.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I've started moving plants today, a slow start , every time I went in doors I brought a pot along . I pick up speed if I see scary temps in the future !

    ReplyDelete
  7. I think I will forever associate that plant with Peter. Mine came from him too, and I owe you thanks for the reminder to bring it in. That foliage is to die for, and the flowers are awfully cute. Mine has yet to bloom, though. Maybe too much shade, but seriously - I always thought it was a shade lover. Am I wrong??

    ReplyDelete
  8. Plants Vs. Zombies, lol, I'm definitely the Zombie in that equation. We have everything dug out, now it's just a matter of getting it in the house. There's been a reprieve here since the hard freeze, I was actually gardening in my shirtsleeves yesterday. I've got cannas and callas drying on the gazebo and have to make room for the dragon wing begonias I want to keep and the old geraniums. I wish I had more room in the house for plants, but alas, it's all stained glass and only one window to the south.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Every year at this time (during The Great Migration) I think I need a greenhouse. I have a covered patio that stays fairly warm but ... well you know. As always, I'm hoping for a mild winter. Thank you for your comments on my blog. Someday we are going to meet and do some rust hunting!

    ReplyDelete
  10. That is such a lovely bloom! I look forward to seeing some shots of your greenhouse. It's nice that Nigel helps you out as a pack animal.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Begonia luxurians is one of the most beautiful begonias, but I've given up on the tropical species. Too much bother (and too little room) to bring them indoors every winter!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Just when I think your photos can't POSSIBLY get any better, they do! :)

    ReplyDelete

Gardening is a solitary activity. But blogging about it is a social phenomenon! I don't make money from my blog by advertising, or use it to drive customers to a business. If you liked my post, or my writing or photography, or even just one picture or turn of phrase, I'd love to hear from you. That's how I get paid.