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Thursday, May 8, 2014

Pacific Coast Iris

Pacific Coast Iris have started flowering in my garden. I love this plant! It's one of the first natives I got for my garden, for free, at a plant swap down in Olympia, before I even had a garden here. I started with four pots of four different ones, and they have thrived and multiplied well. Last year for the first time I divided them, and spread them around. They can be finicky when you divide them, you have to do it in the winter, and they can't stay out of the ground for long. Last year I left some of mine out of the soil overnight, and lost several.

I brought some to last year's Spring Garden Bloggers Plant Exchange in Portland, and I still had yet more that I overwintered in pots to put in my front garden this spring. I bought two new ones last spring, and one of those died over the winter, even though I had planted it in pretty much the same conditions as my first bunch. Ah well. I had names for them once, but the tags have gotten lost in the last four years.









I hope you enjoyed seeing these photos of my Pacific Coast Iris as much as I enjoy seeing them flowering in the garden.

I posted about them for Wildflower Wednesday back in 2012. If you're curious about them and want more info,  you can read that post here.

12 comments:

  1. I love Iris anyway...and when I discovered the world of Pacific Coast Iris, it was like a door was opened...MORE IRIS! Love them all...they are so vibrant, yet, because of their size, sort of demure. BTW...the yellow one I got from you is blooming right now!

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  2. Alison, those are beautiful. Pacific Coast Iris are so much more colorful than Gulf Coast Natives which run to plain blue and plain yellow.

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  3. Gorgeous! Since the tags are gone, you could give them names like Wilma, Peggy, Bob, etc.

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  4. They're beautiful! I still need to make it out to a nursery that has some of these. At least I have lots of naturally-occuring Iris tenax.

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  5. Oh I love that peachy coloured one! I'm always a sucker for oranges.

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  6. Beauties for sure, looking forward to seeing mine bloom next year. Thanks for sharing!

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  7. I'm still waiting for the one I got from you to bloom. It will make me happy if it looks anything like any you show here. In the meantime, I enjoy the delicate, strappy foliage. You are becoming well represented in all of our gardens. I will call mine Alison, regardless of its color.

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  8. You have a beautiful collection. Two of mine died off in last summer's heat but the largest, a beautiful blue flowered variety (nameless) bloomed earlier in the year. I have to try them in an area with more protection from the summer sun...

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  9. So pretty! I've been wanting to replace the bearded iris in my front bed (with the Acer circinatum) with either I. foetidissima or with Pacific Coast Iris. I was leaning towards the foetidissima because of their sturdiness. Do you think that the P.C.I. would do well in this situation? Maybe too sunny? And why would the SPCNI note that they should NOT be watered in the heat of the day?

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  10. I love them too, but they do not thrive in my garden. We have a few that struggle along.

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  11. They are a beautiful lot Alison, lucky to have them all blooming in your garden!

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  12. Those are beautiful natives Alison...wow...the colors are stunning.

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