Don't be fooled. Inside this thin coating of sweetness is a fiery core of total insanity.

Friday, October 26, 2012

One of My Brugs is Blooming!

One of my Brugmansias is blooming! It took long enough. Its growth this year has waxed and waned, growing, then dropping leaves all spring and summer.  I repotted it this spring, and to be honest, I haven't been as conscientious as I should have been about keeping it watered all summer. They like water, especially during the height of summer. I also probably should have brought it out of the house and repotted it earlier than I did. I waited till the weather had warmed up significantly, rather than just bringing it out when the threat of frost had passed. The only fertilizer it received was from the potting soil I used to repot it.

Now, suddenly, I notice it has a flower open, and more buds waiting in the wings.



Brugmansias are also called Angel's Trumpet, and you can see why when you look at the flower. Similar to Datura, which is called Devil's Trumpet, the Brug's flowers point down, whereas Daturas point upward or outward. Both Brugs and Datura are members of the Solanaceae or nightshade family of plants, which also includes tomatoes, peppers and potatoes. The foliage of all those plants, even the food crops, is poisonous. You can read more about Brugs here. There is more information here about growing them and overwintering them in containers.




Brugmansias come from South America, where they grow in the wild into woody trees or shrubs. I don't know enough about Brugs to say what the specific Latin name of mine is. It was one of three passalong rooted starts from Tom, who used to write the blog Seventh Street Cottage. I've had it going on three years now this winter, and this is its first flower ever.

I'm going to need to bring it either into the house, or into the garage soon. Our nights are getting quite cold now. Usually when I overwinter it, I nurse it along all winter, as it slowly drops leaves and looks more and more sickly, until spring comes, and I can bring it outside, whereupon it revives. I've heard you can bring it in and essentially ignore it for most of the winter, watering it once a month. I might try that this year.





11 comments:

  1. Congrats on the flower.......3 years is a long time to wait for it to bloom--you certainly have more patience than me. If it had gone 1 year without blooms----compost!
    LOL!

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  2. Yea for brugmansia blooms! That evening fragrance is worth the wait. Good luck overwintering it.

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  3. Wow, it's spectacular! It takes a true gardener like you to be willing to bring it along for three years in anticipation of blooms. I bet you'd have carried it at least another year, right?

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  4. I brought mine in one year and it got aphids and white fly. Not insurmountable problems but made me wish I had a greenhouse. Yours looks fabulous. Maybe they actually prefer the cooler, shorter days of autumn.

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  5. Since we live in the house my husband grew up in, and I remember his mom growing what she called moonflowers, which are the white blooming daturas, I found a source for them the first year we moved here. I haven't had to find more since. They are self sowing annuals, so I don't bring them in. Once in awhile, though, a plant will survive the winter and grow from the roots.

    Your yellow bloom sure is pretty.

    You mentioned on FB that people were getting warning messages when trying to go to your blog. That happened to me awhile back. I ended up having to delete my blogroll, and start over, with just a few at a time. It had to do with some of the blogs having problems, so that if someone went there from my blog, it would cause a problem, and that's what the warning was about.

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  6. I have not had good success with Brugs but love the look. I tried wintering mine last year, didn't come back. There is a house in town that has a few that are huge....like as tall as a single story house. wow!!

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  7. Nice brug, and I love your shiny silver planter!

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  8. Yea for brugmansia blooms! If you keep them happy they will produce hundreds of flowers. Lots and lots of food and water. My B. 'Charles Grimaldi' has had over 300 blossoms at a time. The fragrance in the gardens in the evenings is fabulous.

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  9. Having just moved all tender plants indoors, I'm feeling like the old woman in the shoe...but I may need to find a way to make room for one of these. That close-up shot is especially convincing.

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  10. Alison, you have so much patience and diligence! The result is worth waiting for, though. A friend of ours has brugs he's grown for years and years planted in a cow tank. I still don't know how he manages to haul them in every year here in Wisconsin, but the flowers are gorgeous. Congratulations on a job well-done.

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  11. Beautiful brug, Alison! I haven't grown any for a while now and I'm starting to get the yen to do so again.

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